Marie Curie’s Notebook


Marie Curie’s Notebook — CJ Chilvers

A look inside a notebook, on experiments from 1899-1902, still radioactive today (and will be 1500 years from today). This reminds me that paper notebooks are still the best format for archiving notes, and handwriting adds humanity to everything — including data collection. (via The Nobel Prize and NinjaEconomics)

If you want things to last for hundreds of years, and remain radioactive, you use paper.

Benefits of a daily diary and topic journals Derek Sivers

Benefits of a daily diary and topic journals Derek Sivers

You can’t trust distant memories. But you can trust your daily diary. It’s the best indicator to your future self (and maybe descendants) of what was really going on in your life at this time.

Truth. I also love his idea for a Thoughts On journal:

For each subject that you might have ongoing thoughts about, start a separate “Thoughts On” journal. Whenever you have some thoughts on this subject, open up that file, write today’s date, then start writing.

The act of drawing something has a “massive” benefit for memory compared with writing it down – Research Digest

The act of drawing something has a “massive” benefit for memory compared with writing it down – Research Digest

In some cases, the patients’ drawings looked just like scribbles. But how good – or bad – the drawings were didn’t seem to matter. In fact, in most of the experiments, the researchers assessed their participants’ ability to create vivid images and also their experience at drawing, and neither was correlated with memory performance. Even people who struggle to create a stick figure should, then, get memory benefits from drawing.

Could also be a good case for using Sketchnotes to capture information.

By the way, both this link and the previous one via Austin Kleon’s always excellent newsletter.