The act of drawing something has a “massive” benefit for memory compared with writing it down – Research Digest

The act of drawing something has a “massive” benefit for memory compared with writing it down – Research Digest

In some cases, the patients’ drawings looked just like scribbles. But how good – or bad – the drawings were didn’t seem to matter. In fact, in most of the experiments, the researchers assessed their participants’ ability to create vivid images and also their experience at drawing, and neither was correlated with memory performance. Even people who struggle to create a stick figure should, then, get memory benefits from drawing.

Could also be a good case for using Sketchnotes to capture information.

By the way, both this link and the previous one via Austin Kleon’s always excellent newsletter.

Ink Foraging in Central Park — The New Yorker

Ink Foraging in Central Park — The New Yorker

On a recent drizzly Tuesday morning, a small group of ink enthusiasts—already rain-slicked, under umbrellas and ponchos—stood on Gapstow Bridge, in Central Park, admiring a brilliant-pink pokeweed bush. The Park was the first stop on a five-hour foraging trip that would take them up to Hudson Heights, to collect foliage and trash, which they would cook, to make ink.

This is really cool! I had no idea this was even a thing.

The Wile Fallet – The Entanglement

The Wile Fallet – The Entanglement

Information storage today is a perfect example of almost everything in the era of the Entanglement: some old problems have been solved, but vastly more have been created, and we have lost virtually all personal control of the information. We have to negotiate with our technology now for it to yield any value, while constantly dodging the vast and terrible threats created by its rampage across the world.

A lovely and incredibly well written ode to the permanence of paper and a brand of file folder I’ve never heard of before.