Embracing Simplicity and Familiarity — Lane Changes

Embracing Simplicity and Familiarity — Lane Changes

I’m always doing a little bit of tinkering with my daily journaling approach, but these days I’m more focused on simplification than on finding the perfect journaling workflow. I have a tendency of overthink things, and the search for the perfect paper-based system led me to a place where I was thinking more about the system, pen, and paper than about what I was actually trying to accomplish each week.

I think this is a common problem. I always recommend that people find what works and stick with it versus a never-ending search for the “perfect” tools and methods. There is no such thing (beyond what is “perfect” for you). Ultimately, he settles on Field Notes. Why?

While there is something to be said for the superior paper options and on-page real estate that larger notebooks bring, Field Notes books offer two big advantages. First, they are easy to carry with me at all times. And second, if I use them daily, they fill up quickly. Filling up notebooks feels very satisfying.

I can’t argue with that.

The Guidance of Notebook Papers | Todd Sattersten

The Guidance of Notebook Papers | Todd Sattersten

It is easy and common to offer a blank page, but we seem to prefer a set of markings to organize our work. Sometimes, the markings serve a general purpose of alignment and coordinates. Other times, the forms are specific to the task.  And sometimes, they are just whimsical.

It’s always amazing to me the vast variety of different page rulings. There are more than a few here I’ve never seen in my travels. Conversely. there were many that came to mind not mentioned.

Capitol Hill Books Has DC’s Most Curmudgeonly Store Owner | Washingtonian

Capitol Hill Books Has DC’s Most Curmudgeonly Store Owner | Washingtonian

Last weekend, I stepped into the store to hunt for a particular title, and realized that Capitol Hill Books is not like most cozy, quiet bookstores where one can browse unbothered, and that’s because Toole is not like most bookstore owners. His idiosyncrasies are present throughout the entire store, from the haphazard organization system—there’s a “Tower of Tolkien” that’s an actual teetering stack of books by the author, and an entire section of books is lodged in the store’s bathroom—to the excessive handwritten signage to the front door, which is covered in rules for would-be customers.

And now I have something at the top of my “Must Visits in D.C.” list.

A 100-year-old Japanese stationery store lets customers design the perfect, custom notebook — Quartz

A 100-year-old Japanese stationery store lets customers design the perfect, custom notebook — Quartz

For about $9 per 60-page notebook, you can mix-and-match ruled, lined, and blank pages in various hues; debate the spectrum of notebook cover choices; and obsess over the right spiral binding color.

On my list for when I visit Japan.

(via Matt Lang)

Agendio Customizable Planners – Build your 2016-2017 Planner

Agendio Customizable Planners – Build your 2016-2017 Planner

Most planners have similar layouts, so you must adapt to your planner.Thats backwards.At Agendio.com, you can customize your layout and personalize your content beforewe print and assemble your individual planner.

This looks amazing! The number of customization options alone are impressive. If you’re looking for a truly personal paper planner this looks like your ticket.

(via Garrick)

The Daily Plan Bar – Rohdesign – Medium

The Daily Plan Bar – Rohdesign – Medium

This past year I’ve started using a modified form of the Bullet Journal approach, using a dot grid notebook, thanks to a gift of an official Bullet Journal Notebook from creator, Ryder Carroll… After using and tweaking The Daily Plan Bar idea for almost a year, It seemed time to document it and share the idea in more detail.

Speaking of Mike Rohde, here’s something neat for all you Bullet Journalers out there. Would even work well as a time tracking tool in any notebook/diary/log.

 

The Last Bookbinder on the Lower East Side | Literary Hub

The Last Bookbinder on the Lower East Side | Literary Hub

Henry’s workshop is five steps below street level, in the basement of the Congregation Sons of Moses synagogue. There are no windows and yet it’s a cheerful place, primarily because of Henry, but also because of the instruments he uses—the oversewing machine with its web of thread, the presses that are tightened by wheel crank, the hand guillotine and the foot guillotine. Some are wickedly efficient, others possessed of a Rube Goldberg charm. Grease is needed to keep these machines in working order, and there’s a sweetness in the air, from the lubricant oils, the leather polish and Elmer’s glue, all of it underlined by the nutty scent of paper recently cut.

Lovely story about a Jewish bookbinder. Part of a dying but still needed art.

(via The Hammock Papers)

 

Finding Poetry in a Note-Taking App – The New Yorker

Finding Poetry in a Note-Taking App – The New Yorker

As I assessed my choices, I discovered that I had certain requirements. I had to be able to draw badly in a note-taking app; I had to be able to incorporate audio recordings of myself saying “Fnaffle” at 3 a.m. so that I could spend the next day trying to figure out its significance; I needed to be able, in the middle of a meditation about nineteenth-century German aphorists, to insert a jpeg image of a large gelid octopus going down on a man with a twelve-pack which I found God knows where in my Internet travels. I settled on OneNote, which seemed the closest to my ideal.

Really interesting and well written essay on how one writer uses her note taking app. It’s a good reminder that it isn’t about analog versus digital or paper versus bits. It’s about what works best for you and how you use those things.